About NCRC

The Nuclear Computational Resource Center (NCRC) was established at INL to provide easy access to computational tools, high performance computing (HPC) resources and training.

Modeling and simulation are essential to nuclear energy innovation, as well as the continued safe, secure and efficient operation of existing nuclear systems.

How you can use the NCRC resources

  • Modeling the behavior of materials in harsh environments (irradiation and high temperatures)
  • Analyzing the performance of existing light water reactors and advanced nuclear reactors
  • Multiscale, multiphysics analysis of nuclear fuel performance

Examples of nuclear energy-related applications include:

Modeling and Simulation Codes

MOOSE
BISON
MARMOT

MOOSE

MOOSE, the Multiphysics Object Oriented Simulation Environment, is a finite-element multiphysics framework largely developed by Idaho National Laboratory. It offers a high level interface to sophisticated nonlinear solver technology, such as BISON for nuclear fuel, Rattlesnake for radiation transport, MAMMOTH for general reactor physics, and more. MOOSE has a straightforward API well suited to how scientists and engineers tackle real-world problems. It is a fully coupled and fully implicit multiphysics solver that is automatically parallel, making it possible to run large simulations and tackle complicated models.

BISON

BISON is a finite element-based nuclear fuel performance code. It is applicable to light water reactor fuel rods, TRISO particle fuel, metallic rod and plate fuel, and other fuel forms. BISON solves thermomechanics and species diffusion equations for 1D, 2D and 3D geometries, with fuel models that describe temperature properties, fission product swelling and other material aspects. Because it is based on the MOOSE framework, Bison can solve problems efficiently using standard workstations or very large high-performance computers.

MARMOT

MARMOT is a mesoscale fuel performance code. As such, it can predict the evolution of the microstructure and material properties of fuels and claddings due to stress, temperature, and irradiation damage. MARMOT can, therefore, supply microstructure-based materials models to other code that works on engineering scale, which is larger than mesoscale, with an example being BISON. MARMOT solves equations involving solid mechanics and heat conduction using the finite element method.

High-Performance Computing

Sawtooth

LEMHI

FALCON

HOODOO

Sawtooth

INL’s newest supercomputer operates with a LINPACK rating of 5.6 petaops, which ranked #37 on the November 2019 TOP500 list. The HPE SGI 8600 system comprises 99,792 cores with 403 TB of memory. The system also includes dedicated GPU capability.

LEMHI

The Lemhi supercomputer is a Dell 6420-based system operating on an OmniPath fat tree network. It came online in the fall of 2018, containing 20,160 cores and 94 total terabytes of memory. Lemhi is rated at 1 petaflop and ranked #427 on the November 2018 TOP500 list.

FALCON

Falcon is a SGI ICE-X distributed memory system with 34,992 cores, 121 TB of memory and a LINPACK rating of 1.1 Petaflop/s. Falcon’s network is a seven-dimensional enhanced hypercube utilizing FDR InfiniBand. Individual compute nodes contain dual Xeon E5-2695 v4 processors with 18 cores each and 128 GB of memory. Falcon came online in Fall 2014 and ranked #97 on the November 2014 TOP500 list.

HOODOO

Hoodoo is a Lambda Hyperplane deep learning distributed memory system with 44 NVIDIA A100 tensor core GPUs and 7.2 TB of total memory. The system provides a maximum performance of 429 TFlops double precision or 858 TFlops single precision.

NCRC News

INL partners with Coreform to improve open-source modeling and simulation tool MOOSE
INL partners with Coreform to improve open-source modeling and simulation tool MOOSE

INL partners with Coreform to improve open-source modeling and simulation tool MOOSELong before an advanced nuclear reactor begins to generate power or another complicated project comes to life, researchers and engineers model and simulate it to ensure success. Now a collaboration between Idaho National...

INL joins High-Performance Computing Consortium to battle COVID-19
INL joins High-Performance Computing Consortium to battle COVID-19

All across the country, individuals and groups are banding together to do whatever they can to fight the COVID-19 pandemic, dedicating resources to helping others. From individuals sewing and donating face masks, to food banks providing millions of meals to those suddenly without income, the resolve...

Idaho’s third supercomputer coming to Collaborative Computing Center
Idaho’s third supercomputer coming to Collaborative Computing Center

IDAHO FALLS, IDAHO – A powerful new supercomputer arrived this week at Idaho National Laboratory’s Collaborative Computing Center. The machine has the power to run complex modeling and simulation applications, which are essential to developing next-generation nuclear technologies.Named after a central...

INL’s supercomputer a boon for Idaho’s students
INL’s supercomputer a boon for Idaho’s students

Today, Mars is cold and dry with only a thin wisp of an atmosphere, but 3.5 billion years ago, the Red Planet was likely a warm, wet world not too dissimilar from Earth.As evidence, researchers point to geological features that look like dry riverbeds and minerals such as clay that form only in the presence...

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