How Idaho National Laboratory is Helping to Solve Globally Challenging ProblemsResearchers at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) are responding to global issues by exploring solutions in sustainable energy development and protecting our nation’s critical infrastructures from natural disasters and human-caused incidents like cyberattacks.

With a rapidly growing population driving greater demand for energy, INL is committed impacting the future by improving the quality of life for people around the world.


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INL Resilience Optimization Center Established to Help Federal Agencies, Private Industry
Idaho National Laboratory News Release

IROC
Idaho National Laboratory has established the INL Resilience Optimization Center (IROC) as an innovation center for system resilience and risk management.

The center draws from INL’s extensive track record as a world leader in critical infrastructure systems analysis and security, as well as its unique, large-scale test ranges.

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Revolutionary Cybersecurity Tool for Protecting Energy Systems Release on GitHub
Idaho National Laboratory News Release

STIG

A revolutionary new cybersecurity tool that can help protect the electric power grid has been released to the public on the code-hosting website GitHub.

Developed by researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Idaho National Laboratory, the Structured Threat Intelligence Graph (STIG) software allows utility owners and operators to easily visualize, share, create, and edit cyberthreat intelligence information.

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Cybercore Integration Center
Idaho National Laboratory

CICThe U.S. is vulnerable to a cyberattack against the critical infrastructure providing electrical power, clean water and other vital services to ensure our national security, lifeline services and economic prosperity. Industrial control systems (ICS) serves as the command center for these vital assets.

Idaho National Laboratory invested in the Cybercore Integration Center to enable partnerships across federal agencies, private industry and university partners to secure control systems from cyberthreats.

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Experts explore options for microreactors in Alaska
By Cory Hatch, Idaho National Laboratory

Alaska MicrogridFor cities in the most isolated regions of Alaska, keeping the lights on is often challenging and almost always expensive.

There’s no good way to string power lines over the vast expanses of wilderness that separate individual towns, so instead of one consolidated grid spanning the entire state, Alaskans get their power from a disconnected mishmash of more than 200 microgrids.

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Advanced Small Modular Reactors
Idaho National Laboratory

SMR

A small modular reactor (SMR) is a nuclear fission reactor with power-generating capacity under 300 megawatts. About 1/3 to 1/4 the size of a traditional nuclear energy plant, SMRs feature compact, simplified designs with advanced safety features.

Small modular reactors are envisioned to vary in size from a couple megawatts up to hundreds of megawatts. Modular designs make it possible to assemble major reactor components offsite and add reactor modules as needed. SMRs can be used for power generation, process heat, desalination or other industrial applications.

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Carbon Free Power Project
Idaho National Laboratory

SMR

The Utah Associated Municipal Power Systems (UAMPS) formally launched the Carbon Free Power Project (CFPP) in 2015 as part of its long-term strategy to reduce carbon emissions and replace aging coal-fired plants with a nonfossil fuel, and medium-sized, flexible power generating source.

The project calls for constructing a Small Modular Reactor (SMR) power plant on DOE’s 890-square-mile Idaho Site using a SMR technology being developed by NuScale Power.

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New INL Computing Facilities and Investment in Idaho’s Future
By Cory Hatch, Idaho National Laboratory

SawtoothIn the fall, Sawtooth, with more than approximately 100,000 computer cores, is scheduled to arrive. When Sawtooth is installed, it’ll be one of the top 100 fastest supercomputers in the world — five times faster than Falcon.

Sawtooth will be housed in the brand new 64,000-square-foot Collaborative Computing Center (C3), one of two new buildings at INL’s Research and Education Campus. Both C3 and the Cybercore Integration Center are under construction after the Idaho Legislature authorized funding to build them. The State Board of Education is overseeing the construction project and will be a close partner in the facilities once they are completed. INL will lease both from the state on long-term agreements.

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