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Geothermal Design Challenge™: GIS Mapping

Geothermal energy is difficult to understand because it is located underground. How can geospatial mapping increase our understanding of this important renewable energy resource? How can GIS improve how we visualize and communicate it? Create a map (digital interactive or static) showing how GIS could portray or enhance the communication of geothermal technology.

No winners have been announced for this contest, please check back later.

No winners have been announced for this contest, please check back later.

Previous Contest Winners

EGS Site Selection Using GIS and Machine Learning
Open-Source Approach to 3-D Communication
Want to Explore FORGE Data?
Infinity and Below
A Humanistic Portrait of Geothermal Energy
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2019 Geothermal Design Challenge Winners

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Geothermal Technologies Office (GTO), in partnership with the Frontier Observatory for Research in Geothermal Energy (FORGE) and Idaho National Laboratory (INL), invited high school and university (undergraduate and graduate) teams to explore the future of geothermal energy and visualize the world of geothermal energy by participating in the 2019 Geothermal Design Challenge™.

Teams of 2 or 3 members researched data, interpreted information, and created a data visualization portfolio that told a compelling story about geothermal energy by answering the challenge question, “Where do you target your next production well to maximize geothermal reservoir performance?”

First

EGS Site Selection Using GIS and Machine Learning

The first place team, BALO Data Science Team, was a collaboration between DePaul University and Georgia Institute of technology and included team members: Sierra Sellman and Michelle Rodrigue.

The winning team, comprised of data science students with backgrounds in geographic information systems, submitted data visualizations targeting an audience unfamiliar with enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) and machine learning. Figure 5 is a screenshot from the team’s submission. Their final portfolio suitability map and proposed well location was based upon robust analyses using Python and ESRI’s ArcMap, ArcScene and strong understanding of the FORGE data.

The BALO Data Science team submission can be found at the following link:
ArcGIS

Second

Open-Source Approach to 3-D Communication

The second place team, W-Team, was from the Colorado School of Mines and included team members Bane Sullivan and Adam Kinard.

This team created a suite of open-source Python packages, enabling available datasets to be incrementally integrated into a 3D scene. Tools used included The Open Mining Format, ParaView, SGeMS, and SimPEG, along with additional tools made by the team itself. Figure 6 is a screenshot from the team’s submission. Three-dimensional (3D) visualizations such as this submission could enable researchers and scientists to rapidly explore data, communicate findings, and facilitate the reproducibility of results.

The W-Team submission can be found at the following link:
Vimeo

Third

Want to Explore FORGE Data?

The third place team, Stanford Geothermal Gals, was from Stanford University and included team members Ahinoam Pollack and Ayaka Abe.

This team’s submission was geared toward an audience with little knowledge of geothermal and laid out the basic concepts of geothermal exploration and well siting using lithology and subsurface temperatures. Figure 7 is a screenshot from the team’s submission. The visualization portfolio was created in Tableau, and can be easily integrated into a classroom curriculum.

The Stanford Geothermal Gals’ submission can be found at the following link:
Tableau Viz

2016 Geothermal Design Challenge Winners

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Geothermal Technologies Office (GTO), in partnership with the Center for Advanced Energy Studies (CAES) and Idaho National Lab (INL), invited both U.S. high school and university (undergraduate & graduate) teams to explore the future of geothermal energy by participating in the 2016 Geothermal Design Challenge.

Teams of two to three members were tasked with researching data, interpreting information and designing an infographic that told a compelling story about the future of geothermal energy.

The challenge theme for the contest was “What is the future of geothermal energy and how will it impact you?” Five topics were presented to the participants to choose from:

  1. History of Geothermal
  2. Workforce and Education
  3. Science and Technology
  4. Environmental Impacts
  5. Economics

Contestants could choose one of the five topics or use a topic of their own choosing about the future of geothermal energy to create their infographic.

First

Infinity and Below

The Grand Prize Winning Team was from Carnegie Mellon University. Members Tiffany Lai, Susie Lee, Marisa Lu made up the team, Infinity and Below.

Quotes from team: “By researching the advantages of it and comparing it to other renewable energies, I learned that geothermal energy is not only cost effective, but also a viable solution to a cleaner, greener energy future. Its benefits outweigh many other renewable energy sources, which was something I had never considered before.”
“Geothermal systems is a practical solution to the energy crisis as a renewable resource that is able to provide more energy than the remaining oil and gas. EGS is stable as well in terms of cost as it does not depend on other sources in order to operate. Geothermal energy is an alternative resource that should be heavily considered.”

View the full infographic here

First

A Humanistic Portrait of Geothermal Energy

The University 1st Place Winning Team was from Yale University. Members Dana Patterson, Daniel Shapiro, Christopher Paolini made up the team, YalEnergy Rockstars. The link below opens the team’s winning entry, “A Humanistic Portrait of Geothermal Energy”.

View the full infographic here

First

Geothermal: Right Beneath Our Feet

The High School 1st Place Winning Team was from Eleanor Roosevelt High School. Members Edward Belsoi, Rokhaya Niang, Hunter Whaples made up the team, Team Roosevelt.

Quote from team: ” I have learned more about specific processes that make geothermal energy possible as well as the possible future scope of geothermal energy.”  “I realize that geothermal has applications far beyond electricity – in the realms of agriculture, civil engineering, and basic building design.”

View the full infographic here

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